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Performance-based logistics (PBL) has become the preferred sustainment strategy for defense organizations and civil businesses deploying complex asset systems such as jets, helicopters, and ships. Instead of buying an entire jet, for example, or the parts, tools, and repairs needed to maintain a jet, today's organizations are now buying the availability or readiness of jets from external service providers who guarantee that the jet's functionality will meet predetermined safety and efficiency objectives. In short, a PBL contract of the highest level stipulates that the service provider is responsible for all of the planning, implementation, and coordination required to maintain and repair an asset system being deployed by the organization that has signed the PBL contract. In some instances, a PBL contract will specify that the service provider first design and build the asset system as well.

Both the organization deploying the complex asset system and the service provider that maintains it need an accurate, routine strategy to meet the safety and efficiency objectives stipulated in the PBL contract. The Asset Configuration ES bundle enables either of these organizations to create and modify the structure of a joint asset system. In addition, it integrates their databases so that when one party creates, changes, or updates the structure of that asset system, the other can transfer the resultant data to its own ERP backend. With the Asset Configuration ES bundle, users can easily identify, track, and plan the maintenance of their complex asset systems, as well.

To create and modify the structure of an asset system with ease, users must be able to view it in the form of a hierarchical model. The structure of an asset system such as an F-16 jet, therefore, is represented as a reference configuration, as a hierarchy that lists every single node of the structure of the jet, from the top down. A reference configuration is like a schematic or diagram that describes what an F-16 jet should include. For example, the jet is comprised of a body, which is itself comprised of a fuselage, wings, tail, and so on. Inside the jet's body there are points to install an engine, a cockpit, landing gear, and a variety of weapons systems, to name a few. The cockpit, for instance, contains a dashboard, a seat, and a throttle, among many other components. In the F-16's reference configuration for each of these components, an installation point is reflected in a discrete, hierarchical structure (an installation point is referred to as a functional location in SAP ERP 6.0).

Whereas all of the jets in a fleet of F-16s are modeled upon a single reference configuration, there is also an allowed configuration. An allowed configuration mirrors a reference configuration, but with important differences. The jet's allowed configuration lists the specific type of engines, rockets, and ailerons that are permitted to be installed in an individual F-16. The allowed configuration may permit three types of engines to be installed in an F-16, but only two types of rockets and one type of aileron. In a fleet of F-16s based upon such an allowed configuration, then, there may be three individual F-16s, each equipped with a different allowed engine. Of those same three jets, however, two may use one type of allowed rocket while the third uses the other allowed type. Since only one type of aileron may be installed in any of the jets in a fleet of F-16s according to the allowed configuration, all three of the jets in this example will have the same allowed aileron (as will every other jet in the fleet).

The master data for the reference configuration of an asset system includes functional locations (FLOCs) (also known in enterprise SOA terms as installation points) but no equipment hierarchies and equipment master records or material master records.

Asset Configuration (click to enlarge)

The allowed configuration (also called a Master Parts List or MPL) includes nodes that represent structural elements and nodes for installation points and material master records that represent the allowed variants at this position.

Figure 1 illustrates reference configuration, allowed configuration, and actual configurations (in other words, particular jets that have serial numbers).

Before describing the process that is involved in configuring an asset, let's clear up a few key terms. In some cases, SAP ERP 6.0 uses different terminology from enterprise SOA, as listed in Table 1.

Table 1. SAP ERP terms and enterprise SOA equivalents

SAP ERP Term

Enterprise SOA Term

Functional Location

Installation Point

Equipment

Individual Material

Material

Material

Measuring Point

Measuring Device

Service Notification

Service Request

Service Order

Service Order

Service Confirmation

Service Confirmation

Service Contract

Service Contract

Measurement Document

Measurement Document

The overall configuration process is both long and complex, consisting of two distinct groups of phases, each of which comprises numerous subprocesses. From beginning to end, there are seven total phases.

Figure 1. Reference configuration, allowed configuration, and actual configuration (click to enlarge)


The first group involves creating a reference and allowed configuration and comprises four phases – establishing a baseline configuration, creating a reference configuration, creating an allowed configuration, and, lastly, establishing the asset system's maintenance requirements. The maintenance requirements will serve as input in the closely related Maintenance Service Collaboration ES bundle.
The second group involves changing those reference configurations that have already been established. It consists of three phases – initiating a reference configuration, changing a reference configuration, and validating a reference configuration change.
Implementing the Asset Configuration ES bundle allows defense organizations and civil businesses deploying complex asset systems such as jets, helicopters, and ships to:

  • Create, change, and update new reference and allowed configurations for complex asset systems
  • Identify, track, and plan the maintenance of complex asset systems
  • Transfer data resulting from additions and modifications to reference and allowed configurations from the backend systems of one user to the backend systems of another user

The Asset Configuration ES bundle leverages enterprise SOA by enabling service-based communications with modules of SAP ERP 6.0 including SAP Plant Management, SAP Materials Management, SAP Document Management System, SAP Controlling Module, SAP Integrated Product and Process Engineering, and SAP Knowledge Management. All customers and partners must provide their own user interfaces to the enterprise services in this bundle.

Audience

The target market for the Asset Configuration ES bundle includes all those organizations and civil businesses that deploy complex asset systems, especially those in the defense and security, aerospace and defense (A&D), industry machinery and construction (IM&C), high-tech, and airline industries.

Some defense customers plan to use these services to implement new collaborative processes together with defense system integrators and implementation partners. Currently some manufacturing customers also plan to use these services to implement a service-oriented architecture. enterprise services form the basis for implementing collaborative processes to support all possible levels of performance-based logistics (PBL) contracts.

Several roles in the organization will use this bundle, including:

  • the engineering authority, who is responsible for configuring the asset
  • the technical authority, who verifies the asset's configuration
  • the configuration manager, who decides what types of parts will be included in a particular asset
  • configuration management personnel, who verify that given assets conform to the configuration manager's directives

    For details on Service Operations, Business Objects and Process Components, please check the ES Workplace.


How To Use This ES Bundle

Until now, defense organizations and civil businesses have had to create their new asset configuration systems manually. Not only has this process has been laborious, but it has also been lengthy, typically requiring months for workers to unload the paper forms received from the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), organize them, and then literally type every piece of data needed to recreate an asset configuration in their own system.

Today, however, the services in the Asset Configuration ES bundle enable users to build composite applications that enable them to create the configuration for an entire complex asset system more completely and accurately and in a dramatically decreased timeframe. This consolidation results as well in the vast reduction of errors, both in the configuration creation process and in the maintenance process. In addition, it gives the user of a system the possibility of outsourcing the creation (and maintenance) of the asset configuration to the organization that produced it – the vendor or manufacturer of the complex asset.

Although the overall configuration process is as long and as it is complex, the Asset Configuration ES bundle renders the tasks required to complete it quite manageable. Regardless of the vantage point in the configuration landscape, authorized personnel such as engineering authorities, technical authorities, configuration managers, maintenance planners, and maintenance supervisors and contractors have 360-degree visibility. As such, they can create, change, and update reference and allowed configurations on demand. Deployed in concert with the Maintenance Service Collaboration ES bundle, the Asset Configuration ES bundle has the further benefit of empowering users to easily identify, track, plan, and execute the maintenance and repair of complex asset systems.

The First Group of Processes: Creating a Reference Configuration

The first group of processes includes the steps entailed in creating a reference configuration, as shown in Figure 2.

Establishing the Initial Structure

In phase one of the first group of processes, the baseline configuration for a type of asset system must be established. For example, it may be that an organization is interested in developing a new type of jet but wishes to model its technology on an older jet that is still in service. To do this, an engineering authority invokes services in the Asset Configuration ES bundle to search for and review the asset system's Statement of Requirement (SOR) in its SAP Document Management System (SAP DMS). Written by a program technical manager from a defense or civil organization in collaboration with any potential manufacturer of the desired asset system, an SOR is a document that details the specifications and requirements that a given asset system is built to meet. A simple example would depict an organization whose SOR lists an engine powerful enough to enable a jet to fly at a minimum desired speed.

Figure 2. Creating a Reference Configuration (click to enlarge)

Upon examination of the SOR, the engineering authority determines whether the new configuration is compatible with one of the organization's existing assets. Making this decision requires that the authority also review the current structure, comparing its capabilities with those that must be included in the baseline configuration to be created for the new asset system. Points of examination might include functional location (FLOC), equipment, material and Bill of Material structures (BOMs).

Creating the Reference Configuration

Once the requirements for the baseline structure have been established, the engineering authority can proceed to the next phase of the overall process, which involves creating a reference configuration. To begin, she ensures that a previously defined mapping table containing all data from the OEM or the service provider has been stored in SAP Plant Maintenance (SAP PM), distinguishing between FLOCs, equipment, master parts lists (MPLs), material records, and BOMs.

Until now, each phase of the process has entailed tasks that are preparatory to building the new reference configuration. In the next subprocess of phase two, however, the engineering authority begins to create the actual configuration. To do so, she saves the old configuration as a reference configuration for the new asset system, makes any necessary changes to the new configuration, and then saves those changes.

The engineering authority will execute several other vital tasks at this point, including the creation of the configuration's equipment master records, material master, FLOC hierarchy, MPLs, and BOMs. Sometimes there may not be a configuration on which to base the new configuration. In this case, the engineering authority must create a new reference configuration from scratch, based on data supplied by the service provider. Lastly, the authority will create reports identifying any discrepancies that occur on final loading of the new configuration.

In the final subprocess of the second phase of the asset configuration process, the engineering authority validates the new reference configuration prior to releasing it to users. Once she has reported any variants for the configuration, she displays the configuration and updates its status as approved.

Creating the Allowed Configuration

Phase three of the asset configuration process involves creating the asset system's allowed configuration and includes three vital subprocesses. First, the engineering authority must substantiate any variances between the allowed configuration for the existing model asset and the allowed configuration now under construction. As ever, reports are created for any discovered variance discrepancies. When she does encounter differences between the two configurations, the authority will initiate the steps required to make the appropriate changes in the new asset system's allowed configuration.

After she has examined and verified the existing asset system's allowed configuration, the engineering authority saves it as the allowed configuration for the new asset system. As in the create reference configuration phase, the engineering authority once again executes such vital tasks as creating the configuration's MPL access node (the top-level node in the configuration hierarchy, represented by the asset system itself), MPL structure node (a sub-tier node, represented, for example, by an engine or landing gear system), MPL variant node (a sub-sub-tier node, represented by a specific engine, for example, that may be installed at a given node), and MPL relationship.

In the last subprocess of phase three of the overall asset configuration process, the engineering authority validates the new allowed structure before releasing it for open usage. It is critical during this process that she meticulously examine and validate each and every component to be included in the new asset system. Once she has done this and reported any variants for configuration, she again displays the configuration and updates its status as approved.

Creating Maintenance Requirements

Phase four of creating reference and allowed configurations for a complex asset system describes the creation of those maintenance requirements that must be adhered to once an organization has actually deployed an asset system. Such requirements, for example, may detail the frequency with which a jet engine must have its oil changed or the tires on a set of landing gear replaced. The subprocesses include analyzing the maintenance requirements, loading and preparing maintenance plans, loading and preparing maintenance task lists, and loading and preparing all measures and counters.

Analyzing the maintenance requirements consists primarily in examining the supportability data received from the OEM to ensure that it accords with the specifications listed in the SOR and other related documentation (such as the logistics support analysis record or LSAR, or interactive electronic technical manual or IETM) that the engineering authority loaded in an earlier phase.

Next, the technical authority must define a list of detailed maintenance plans for all of the equipment and materials associated with the respective complex asset system, and then load them into SAP ERP 6.0. On occasion, a plan may need modification once it has been loaded. Should this be the case, now is the time for the technical authority to execute such changes or updates.

Each of the requirements associated with the maintenance plan for the asset system's equipment and materials have related task lists, all of which the technical authority must load and prepare, as well. As with the maintenance plans, now and then a task list may need modification once it has been loaded. If such changes or updates are necessary, the technical authority will execute them now.

During the final subprocess in phase four of the asset configuration process, the technical authority must load the data for all counters and measurers used to monitor the equipment and materials in the respective asset system, creating the reference measuring points and the reference measuring point relationships along the way.

A measuring point in an asset configuration is defined as any means of monitoring the usage of the asset system, equipment, or material in or attached to the asset system. A measuring point may be a meter or gauge used to count the miles traveled, rotations turned, or hours flown, sailed, or driven, as well as the pressure, temperature, height, or depth to which any asset system or part has been subjected. Since it is imperative that the actual usage of any equipment or material in an asset system be placed in context of the parameters within which that asset system can function safely and efficiently, relationships must be established between the two. For example, if a maintenance requirement states that tires on the landing gear of an F-16 must be replaced after a given number of takeoffs and landings, a relationship must be established between the stated maintenance requirement and the number counted on the actual gear. In this fashion, service providers can ensure that the tires are replaced once they have met or exceeded their allowed usage. If at this stage measurers or counters need modification, the technical authority would make the necessary adjustments prior to final approval.

The Second Group of Processes: Changing an Asset Configuration

The second group in the overall asset configuration process – phases five through seven – concern the means by which users change established reference configurations, as shown in Figure 3.

A number of factors can precipitate the need for such changes. The most common is the need to add new parts or variants to the allowed configuration of an asset system. For instance, it may be that a new type of gasket or screw has been authorized for use in the engine of an asset system. The second most common factor driving change is reflected in the need to modify the conditions under which a given piece of equipment must undergo maintenance. An air filter may need to be changed more frequently, depending upon the terrain and climate in which it is being used, for example. More rarely, recurring failures in a given asset system may result in configuration modifications, as may other safety concerns or improvements as identified by standard mean-time-between-failure (MTBF) or other KPI analyses. It may also be that users simply require new functionality.

Figure 3. Changing an Asset Configuration (click to enlarge)

Initiating a Reference Configuration Change

Typically, the trigger for a change in a given configuration is a notice from the OEM. Once the notice has been received, a formal request for a change in the reference configuration is submitted by the organization deploying the complex asset system and then sent to the engineering authority for review.

When reviewing the request to change a reference configuration, the engineering authority will compare the specifications listed in the request against any existing standards to ensure that both the new configuration and its respective MPL are compliant. In addition, she will specify all effectivity parameters for relevant platforms.

To initiate the change to the reference configuration, either the technical authority or the configuration manager will send a notice to the service provider to indicate that the change has been approved, along with an assessment of the importance and urgency of the need to change the as-maintained configuration.

Changing the Reference Configuration

If the as-maintained configuration does require changes, the technical authority or configuration manager will also direct the holding units accordingly. It is also possible for the technical authority or configuration manager to bypass this approval-notice step and personally execute the change. If none of these personnel can perform the work, however, the service provider will execute it. The changes will include updates to the MPL and the operational roles, all of which the technical authority or configuration manager will address in a notice that confirms the work's completion.

Validating the Configuration Change

In the final subprocess of this phase, the configuration manager must ensure that all pertinent drawings and MPLs have been updated and that the respective change information has been received by all personnel involved in managing the pertinent asset system's as-maintained configuration.

This section will explore a series of use cases for the Asset Configuration ES bundle. Because the process outlined earlier is so complex, we will break it down into smaller use cases. Each use case will show how different outcomes can be achieved by using the enterprise services in different combinations. While these examples illustrate a few of the ways that this ES bundle could be used, the intention is to show the flexibility and reusability of the business objects and enterprise service operations so that you will have a clearer understanding of how to best deploy them in your own environment. This wiki is also a space for you to share knowledge and collaborate with others who are implementing the Asset Configuration ES bundle.

Use Case 1: Creating a Reference Configuration for a Complex Asset System

A defense organization is developing a new fighter jet and wants to model its technology on an older jet that is still in service, an F-16. The process is multifaceted and begins when the engineering authority assigned to oversee the project constructs a baseline configuration for the new jet's imminent reference configuration.

Establishing the Initial Structure

To search for and review the new fighter jet's Statement of Requirement (SOR) in the SAP Document Management System (SAP DMS), the engineering authority invokes Read Document File Variant service operation, which uses the Document business object.

Since the engineering authority must first determine whether the new configuration is compatible with the F-16, she reviews its structure by way of comparing its capabilities with those that must be included in the baseline configuration to be created for the new fighter jet. Points of examination might include functional location (FLOC), equipment, material and Bill of Material structures (BOMs). To create any new documents that pertain to the asset system or its reference configuration, the engineering authority can trigger the Create Document service operation, which also uses the Document business object.

Creating the Reference Configuration

Once the requirements for the new fighter's baseline structure have been established, the engineering authority can proceed to the next phase of the overall process, which involves creating the new fighter's actual reference configuration. Sometimes it is not possible to locate a reference configuration for an existing asset system that is suitable to use as the model for the baseline configuration of a new asset system. In such a case, the engineering authority would need to create a new reference configuration from scratch. She can begin this process by invoking the Create Installation Point Template service operation, which uses the Installation Point Template business object. In this case, however, the engineering authority has determined that the reference configuration for the existing F-16 is satisfactory, so she will use it as the model for the new fighter's configuration.
To search for and examine equipment, for instance, she can invoke the Find Reference Installation Point by Elements service operation, which uses the Installation Point Template business object. The Asset Configuration ES bundle also provides services to locate any other component in a reference configuration. These include the Find Installation Point Template by Elements, Find Parent Installation Point Template by Installation Point Template, Find Subordinate Installation Point Template by Installation Point Template, and the Find Top Level Installation Point Template by Installation Point Template service operations, all of which use the Installation Point Template business object, as well.

In addition, should the engineering authority require them, the following services are available, too: Find Individual Material by Elements, Find Parent Individual Material by Individual Material, Find Subordinate Individual Material by Individual Material, and Find Top Level Individual Material by Individual Material. Each of these services uses the Individual Material business object. They handle not only single pieces of equipment but also structures of equipment.

At this point in the reference configuration creation phase, the engineering authority executes several other vital tasks, including the creation of the configuration's equipment master records, master material, FLOC hierarchy, MPLs, and BOMs. Reference points can be installed by triggering the Create Reference Installation Point service operation, which also uses the Installation Point Template business object. Should the engineering authority need to add material or equipment to the new reference configuration's material hierarchy, or install equipments into a FLOC or an equipment hierarchy, she can trigger the Install Individual Material in Individual Material Hierarchy and the Install Individual Material in Installation Point service operations, respectively, both of which use the Individual Material business object. In that case the equipment is used as a reference object which will be used as a template during the creation process of structures for real existing systems. To create a Bill of Material for the new configuration, the engineering authority can invoke the Create Individual Material Bill of Material service operation, which uses the Individual Material business object.

Having saved the F-16's reference configuration as the configuration for the new fighter jet and then performed all requisite checks, changes, and additions, the engineering authority will create reports identifying any discrepancies or gaps that occurred upon loading the configuration. When all is said and done, she will validate the new reference configuration prior to releasing it to users. To do this, she can trigger the Update Installation Point Template service operation, which uses the Installation Point Template business object.

Step

Enterprise Service Invoked

Step 1: The user searches and reviews the new product's Statement of Requirement

Read Document File Variant

Step 2: To create a new document

Create Document

Step 3: The user needs to create a new reference configuration

Create Installation Point Template

Step 4: To search for and examine equipment

Find Reference Installation Point by Elements

Step 5: To locate any other component in a reference configuration

Find Installation Point Template by Elements or
Find Parent Installation Point Template by Installation Point Template or
Find Subordinate Installation Point Template by Installation Point Template or
Find Top Level Installation Point Template by Installation Point Template

Step 6: To find individual material according to specific data

Find Individual Material by Elements or
Find Parent Individual Material by Individual Material or
Find Subordinate Individual Material by Individual Material or
Find Top Level Individual Material by Individual Material

Step 7: To install reference points

Create Reference Installation Point

Step 8: The user needs to add material or equipment to the new reference configuration's material hierarchy, or install equipments into a FLOC or an equipment hierarchy

Install Individual Material in Individual Material Hierarchy and
Install Individual Material in Installation Point

Step 9: To create a Bill of Material for the new configuration

Create Individual Material Bill of Material

Step 10: To validate the new reference configuration prior to releasing it to users

Update Installation Point Template

Use Case 2: Creating an Allowed Configuration for a Complex Asset System

The engineering authority working for the defense organization that is developing a new fighter jet has just created the fighter's reference configuration from that of a related jet and is now ready to continue the process by creating the fighter's allowed configuration. Just as she used the reference configuration for an F-16 to create the baseline configuration for the new fighter jet, so too the engineering authority will use the allowed configuration for the F-16 as a model for the new fighter jet's allowed configuration.

To begin, the engineering authority reviews the allowed configuration for the F-16 by way of comparing its capabilities with those that must be included in the allowed configuration for the new fighter jet. Here, too, she will substantiate any variances between the two configurations and create reports for any noted discrepancies. When she does encounter differences, the engineering authority will follow the process steps outlined in use case 4.

After she has examined and verified the configurations, the engineering authority loads the new allowed configuration. As in the reference configuration creation phase, at this point the engineering authority will create the allowed configuration's access nodes, structure nodes, and variant nodes with the assigned material master records for the different allowed variants at the different nodes, and, if there are any, the necessary relationships between different nodes and variants.

She can search for and examine any MPL by invoking the Read Master Parts List Access Node, Read Master Parts List Structure Node, and Read Master Parts List Variant service operations, all of which use the Master Parts List business object. To create new access-, structure-, or variant nodes for MPLs, she can invoke the Create Master Parts List Access Node, Create Master Parts List Structure Node, and Create Master Parts List Variant Node service operations respectively. All resulting data is stored in the SAP Integrated Product and Process Engineering backbone.

Finally, the engineering authority validates the new allowed configuration before releasing it for open usage. It is critical during this process that she meticulously examine and validate each and every variant in an allowed configuration of an asset system. Once she has done this and reported any variants of the configuration gaps, she again displays the configuration and updates its status as approved by triggering the Update Installation Point Template service operation, which uses the Installation Point Template business object.

Step

Enterprise Service Invoked

Step 1: To search for and examine any Master Parts List

Read Master Parts List Access Node and
Read Master Parts List Structure Node and
Read Master Parts List Variant

Step 2: To create new access-, structure-, or variant nodes for the Master Parts List

Create Master Parts List Access Node and
Create Master Parts List Structure Node and
Create Master Parts List Variant Node

Step 3: To display the configuration and to update its status as approved

Update Installation Point Template

Use Case 3: Creating Maintenance Requirements for the Reference Configuration of a Complex Asset System

The engineering authority responsible for designing and creating the reference and allowed configurations for the fighter jet has just instructed the technical authority to create the maintenance requirements for the jet.

Such requirements typically detail the frequency with which the jet's engine must have its oil changed or the tires on its landing gear replaced, depending upon the initial analysis.

Analyzing the maintenance requirements for the new jet consists primarily of examining the supportability data received from the OEM to ensure that it accords with the specifications listed in the SOR and other related documentation that was loaded in an earlier phase.

To find and examine the maintenance plan for the F-16 on which the new fighter jet is being based, the technical authority can invoke the Read Maintenance Plan service operation, which uses the Maintenance Plan business object. If by chance he does not have the name or code of the plan at his disposal, he can search for it according to data contained in it. To initiate the search, he can trigger the Find Maintenance Plan by Elements service operation, which also uses the Maintenance Plan business object.

Every asset system's maintenance plan requires a task list. The technical authority can access any list he wishes to examine by invoking the Read Maintenance Task List service operation, which uses the Maintenance Task List business object. The authority may also trigger the Find Maintenance Task List by Basic Data to search for a task list whose name or code he does not have handy. This service uses the Maintenance Task List business object, too.

Since asset systems are by nature complex, it is typically the case that their maintenance plans and task lists are also complex. Because of this, a task list will often be outlined hierarchically, beginning with the general requirements and narrowing toward specific details. To view a task list from different vantage points, the technical authority can invoke the Find Parent Maintenance Task List By Maintenance Task List, Find Subordinate Maintenance Task List by Maintenance Task List, and Find Top Level Maintenance Task List By Maintenance Task List service operations, all of which use the Maintenance Task List business object.

Having analyzed the maintenance requirements, the technical authority will now create a list of detailed maintenance plans and respective task lists for the new fighter jet and then load them into SAP ERP 6.0. To create the maintenance plan, he can invoke the Create Maintenance Plan service operation, which uses the Maintenance Plan business object. To create the task list, he can trigger the Create Maintenance Task List service operation, which uses the Maintenance Task List business object. To create a hierarchical task list that includes top-level, parent, and subordinate lists, the technical authority can trigger the Create Maintenance Task List as Bundle service operation.

Maintenance plans and task lists require occasional modifications. To change the maintenance plan, the technical authority can trigger the Update Maintenance Plan service operation, which uses the Maintenance Plan business object. To modify any affiliated task lists, he can invoke the Update Maintenance Task List service operation, which uses the Maintenance Task List business object.

The technical authority must also find, examine, create, and load the data for all counters and measurers used to monitor the equipment and materials in the respective asset system. For that, in the reference structure, the technical authority can define reference measuring point or reference measuring counters using services for creating the reference measuring points and the reference measuring point relationships .

To find and examine any measuring device specifications, the technical authority can invoke the Read Measuring Device Template service operation, which uses the Measuring Device Template business object. To search for measuring device specifications when the name or code of a pertinent file is not at hand, the technical authority can trigger the Find Measuring Device Template by Basic Data service operation, which also uses the Measuring Device Template business object.

When he is ready to create the device templates and relationships, the technical authority can invoke the Create Measuring Device Template and the Create Measuring Device Template Relationship service operations, respectively.

If at any time a measurer, counter, or relationship requires modification, the technical authority can invoke the Change Measuring Device Template and Change Measuring Device Template Relationship service operations. Upon final approval of the overall maintenance plan, task lists, measuring devices, and relationships, the technical authority will once again invoke the Update Maintenance Plan service operation.

Step

Enterprise Service Invoked

Step 1: To find and examine the maintenance plan

Read Maintenance Plan

Step 2: The user also can search the maintenance plan according to specific data

Find Maintenance Plan by Elements

Step 3: To access the task list the user wishes to examine

Read Maintenance Task List

Step 4: The user also can search the task list according to specific data

Find Maintenance Task List by Basic Data

Step 5: To view a task list from different vantage points

Find Parent Maintenance Task List By Maintenance Task List and
Find Subordinate Maintenance Task List by Maintenance Task List and
Find Top Level Maintenance Task List By Maintenance Task List

Step 6: To create a maintenance plan

Create Maintenance Plan

Step 7: To create a task list

Create Maintenance Task List

Step 8: To create a hierarchical task list that includes top-level, parent, and subordinate lists

Create Maintenance Task List as Bundle

Step 9: To change the maintenance plan

Update Maintenance Plan

Step 10: To modify any affiliated task lists

Update Maintenance Task List

Step 11: To find and examine any measuring device specifications

Read Measuring Device Template

Step 12: The user also can search any measuring device specifications according to specific data

Find Measuring Device Template by Basic Data

Step 13: To create the device templates and relationships

Create Measuring Device Template and
Create Measuring Device Template Relationship

Step 14: To modify a measurer, counter, or relationship

Change Measuring Device Template and
Change Measuring Device Template Relationship

Step 15: To approve the overall maintenance plan, task lists, measuring devices, and relationships

Update Maintenance Plan

Use Case 4: Changing the Reference Configuration for a Complex Asset System

Established reference configurations sometimes require modification, precipitated by any number of factors. New parts or variants may need to be added to the configuration of an asset system, for example, when a new type of gasket or screw has been authorized for use in the engine of jet. The maintenance parameters for a given piece of equipment can also change. For instance, an air filter may need to be changed more frequently, depending upon the terrain in which it is being used.

Typically, however, a notice is received from the OEM detailing a change in the configuration. Once the notice has been received, a formal request for a change in the reference configuration is submitted by the organization deploying the complex asset system and then sent to the engineering authority for review.

When reviewing the request to change a reference configuration, the engineering authority will compare the specifications listed in the request against any existing standards to ensure that both the new configuration and its respective MPL are compliant.

In addition, she will specify all effectivity parameters for relevant platforms. Multiple and various service operations will be needed during this process, contingent upon the nature of the change request. The Read Document File Variant service operation, for instance, will nearly always be executed first, since the engineering authority, technical authority, or configuration manager overseeing the process must review the pertinent asset system's SOR before making any further decisions.

If materials or equipment have been authorized for use in an asset, attendant users may wish to view the respective FLOCs and hence trigger any one of the service operations related to installation points, including the Find Reference Installation Point by Elements and Find Installation Point Template by Elements service operations, to name a few, all of which use the Installation Point Template business object. Should the user need to review material-related data, he can execute the Find Individual Material by Elements, Find Parent Individual Material by Individual Material, Find Subordinate Individual Material by Individual Material, or Find Top Level Individual Material by Individual Material service operations, which use the Individual Material business object.

The user can search for and examine all MPL-related information by invoking the Read Master Parts List Access Node, Read Master Parts List Structure Node, or Read Master Parts List Variant service operations, all of which use the Master Parts List business object. Maintenance plans and task lists can be examined by executing the services that use the Maintenance Plan and Maintenance Task List business objects, respectively.

At this point, the technical authority or the configuration manager will initiate the indicated changes and then deploy the appropriate update services. These could include the Update Installation Point Template, Update Individual Material, Update Maintenance Plan, Update Maintenance Task List, and the Update Master Parts List service operations. Once the changes have been effected and updated, the user needs merely notify those personnel involved in managing the pertinent asset system's reference configuration.

Step

Enterprise Service Invoked

Step 1: To review the pertinent asset system's SOR

Read Document File Variant

Step 2: To view the respective functional locations

Find Reference Installation Point by Elements and
Find Installation Point Template by Elements

Step 3: To review material-related data

Find Individual Material by Elements or
Find Parent Individual Material by Individual Material or
Find Subordinate Individual Material by Individual Material or
Find Top Level Individual Material by Individual Material

Step 4: To search for and examine all Master Parts List-related information

Read Master Parts List Access Node or
Read Master Parts List Structure Node or
Read Master Parts List Variant

Step 5: To update the information

Update Installation Point Template and
Update Individual Material and
Update Maintenance Plan and
Update Maintenance Task List and
Update Master Parts List

Future Directions

A related ES bundle, referred to as Take-Over/Hand-Over, may be added to provide mapping of an XML file to ERP, making it easier to load complex asset systems into SAP ERP.

System Requirements

Related ES Bundles

End-to-end Processes Where This ES Bundle Is Used

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